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How To Disable Login Requests On Mac For Scoped Bookmark Agent

 

I found many choices like Disable Anti-AdBlock, AdBlock's own blocker and many more. Some stopped everything from happening. I tried options for hours and finally have Disable Anti-AdBlock and NoScript installed. After configuring them to block/stop offending sites, the pop-ups seem to have ended. Also, the 'Unique ID' should vary for machines with same GUID as this ID is generated for every system entry on ePO, whether McAfee agent is installed or not! I am afraid I do not have machines with same GUIDs to test it out and hence I would request you to run the query for both the machines to confirm the same. I sincerely hope this helps.

  1. How To Disable Login Requests On Mac For Scoped Bookmark Agent Version
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The Mac Users login to their machines with AD Username and Passwords, and the Entourage client pops up requesting Usename, Domain & Password when they connect. So that's how they work. Now when they go to open a HTML email or go to the internet - the Keychain keeps popping up - the user clicks cancel about 20 times and eventually they are able. In order to access security scoped bookmarks in a different app they have to be transferred as NSData and re-resolved in the other application. In my case I show an open dialog in the main application and then save the scoped bookmark into a shared NSUserDefaults suite. Built-in privacy features help protect your information and keep your Mac secure. An updated start page helps you easily and quickly save, find, and share your favorite sites. And Siri suggestions surface bookmarks, links from your reading list, iCloud Tabs, links you receive in Messages, and more.

This article describes how Azure Resource Manager throttles requests. It shows you how to track the number of requests that remain before reaching the limit, and how to respond when you've reached the limit.

Throttling happens at two levels. Azure Resource Manager throttles requests for the subscription and tenant. If the request is under the throttling limits for the subscription and tenant, Resource Manager routes the request to the resource provider. The resource provider applies throttling limits that are tailored to its operations. The following image shows how throttling is applied as a request goes from the user to Azure Resource Manager and the resource provider.

Subscription and tenant limits

Every subscription-level and tenant-level operation is subject to throttling limits. Subscription requests are ones that involve passing your subscription ID, such as retrieving the resource groups in your subscription. Tenant requests don't include your subscription ID, such as retrieving valid Azure locations.

The default throttling limits per hour are shown in the following table.

ScopeOperationsLimit
Subscriptionreads12000
Subscriptiondeletes15000
Subscriptionwrites1200
Tenantreads12000
Tenantwrites1200

These limits are scoped to the security principal (user or application) making the requests and the subscription ID or tenant ID. If your requests come from more than one security principal, your limit across the subscription or tenant is greater than 12,000 and 1,200 per hour.

These limits apply to each Azure Resource Manager instance. There are multiple instances in every Azure region, and Azure Resource Manager is deployed to all Azure regions. So, in practice, the limits are higher than these limits. The requests from a user are usually handled by different instances of Azure Resource Manager.

Resource provider limits

Resource providers apply their own throttling limits. Because Resource Manager throttles by principal ID and by instance of Resource Manager, the resource provider might receive more requests than the default limits in the previous section.

This section discusses the throttling limits of some widely used resource providers.

Storage throttling

The following limits apply only when you perform management operations by using Azure Resource Manager with Azure Storage.

ResourceLimit
Storage account management operations (read)800 per 5 minutes
Storage account management operations (write)10 per second / 1200 per hour
Storage account management operations (list)100 per 5 minutes

Network throttling

The Microsoft.Network resource provider applies the following throttle limits:

OperationLimit
write / delete (PUT)1000 per 5 minutes
read (GET)10000 per 5 minutes

Compute throttling

For information about throttling limits for compute operations, see Troubleshooting API throttling errors - Compute.

For checking virtual machine instances within a virtual machine scale set, use the Virtual Machine Scale Sets operations. For example, use the Virtual Machine Scale Set VMs - List with parameters to check the power state of virtual machine instances. This API reduces the number of requests.

Azure Resource Graph throttling

Azure Resource Graph limits the number of requests to its operations. The steps in this article to determine the remaining requests and how to respond when the limit is reached also apply to Resource Graph. However, Resource Graph sets its own limit and reset rate. For more information, see Resource Graph throttling headers.

Other resource providers

For information about throttling in other resource providers, see:

Error code

When you reach the limit, you receive the HTTP status code 429 Too many requests. The response includes a Retry-After value, which specifies the number of seconds your application should wait (or sleep) before sending the next request. If you send a request before the retry value has elapsed, your request isn't processed and a new retry value is returned.

After waiting for specified time, you can also close and reopen your connection to Azure. By resetting the connection, you may connect to a different instance of Azure Resource Manager.

If you're using an Azure SDK, the SDK may have an auto retry configuration. For more information, see Retry guidance for Azure services.

Some resource providers return 429 to report a temporary problem. The problem could be an overload condition that isn't directly caused by your request. Or, it could represent a temporary error about the state of the target resource or dependent resource. For example, the network resource provider returns 429 with the RetryableErrorDueToAnotherOperation error code when the target resource is locked by another operation. To determine if the error comes from throttling or a temporary condition, view the error details in the response.

Remaining requests

You can determine the number of remaining requests by examining response headers. Read requests return a value in the header for the number of remaining read requests. Write requests include a value for the number of remaining write requests. The following table describes the response headers you can examine for those values:

Response headerDescription
x-ms-ratelimit-remaining-subscription-readsSubscription scoped reads remaining. This value is returned on read operations.
x-ms-ratelimit-remaining-subscription-writesSubscription scoped writes remaining. This value is returned on write operations.
x-ms-ratelimit-remaining-tenant-readsTenant scoped reads remaining
x-ms-ratelimit-remaining-tenant-writesTenant scoped writes remaining
x-ms-ratelimit-remaining-subscription-resource-requestsSubscription scoped resource type requests remaining.
This header value is only returned if a service has overridden the default limit. Resource Manager adds this value instead of the subscription reads or writes.
x-ms-ratelimit-remaining-subscription-resource-entities-readSubscription scoped resource type collection requests remaining.
This header value is only returned if a service has overridden the default limit. This value provides the number of remaining collection requests (list resources).
x-ms-ratelimit-remaining-tenant-resource-requestsTenant scoped resource type requests remaining.
This header is only added for requests at tenant level, and only if a service has overridden the default limit. Resource Manager adds this value instead of the tenant reads or writes.
x-ms-ratelimit-remaining-tenant-resource-entities-readTenant scoped resource type collection requests remaining.
This header is only added for requests at tenant level, and only if a service has overridden the default limit.

The resource provider can also return response headers with information about remaining requests. For information about response headers returned by the Compute resource provider, see Call rate informational response headers.

Retrieving the header values

Retrieving these header values in your code or script is no different than retrieving any header value.

For example, in C#, you retrieve the header value from an HttpWebResponse object named response with the following code:

In PowerShell, you retrieve the header value from an Invoke-WebRequest operation.

For a complete PowerShell example, see Check Resource Manager Limits for a Subscription.

If you want to see the remaining requests for debugging, you can provide the -Debug parameter on your PowerShell cmdlet.

Which returns many values, including the following response value:

To get write limits, use a write operation:

Which returns many values, including the following values:

In Azure CLI, you retrieve the header value by using the more verbose option.

Which returns many values, including the following values:

How to disable login requests on mac for scoped bookmark agent search

To get write limits, use a write operation:

Which returns many values, including the following values:

Next steps

  • For a complete PowerShell example, see Check Resource Manager Limits for a Subscription.
  • For more information about limits and quotas, see Azure subscription and service limits, quotas, and constraints.
  • To learn about handling asynchronous REST requests, see Track asynchronous Azure operations.

The Proxy tool lies at the heart of Burp's user-driven workflow, and gives you a direct view into how your target application works 'under the hood'. It operates as a web proxy server, and sits as a man-in-the-middle between your browser and destination web servers. This lets you intercept, inspect, and modify the raw traffic passing in both directions.

If the application employs HTTPS, Burp breaks the TLS connection between your browser and the server, so that even encrypted data can be viewed and modified within Burp's tools.

How To Disable Login Requests On Mac For Scoped Bookmark Agent Version

Getting set up

Burp Proxy works in conjunction with the browser that you are using to access the target application. You can either:

  • Use Burp's embedded browser, which requires no additional configuration. Go to the 'Proxy' > 'Intercept' tab and click 'Open Browser'. A new browser session will open in which all traffic is proxied through Burp automatically. You can even use this to test over HTTPS without the need to install Burp's CA certificate.
  • Use an external browser of your choice. For various reasons, you might not want to use Burp's embedded browser. In this case, you need to perform some additional steps to configure your browser to work with Burp, and install Burp's CA certificate in your browser.

When you have things set up, visit any URL in your browser, then go to the 'Proxy' > 'Intercept' tab in Burp Suite. If everything is working, you should see an HTTP request displayed for you to view and modify. You will need to forward HTTP messages as they appear in order to continue browsing. You should also see entries appearing on the 'HTTP history' tab.

Intercepting requests and responses

The Intercept tab displays individual HTTP requests and responses that have been intercepted by Burp Proxy for review and modification. This feature is a key part of Burp's user-driven workflow:

  • Manually reviewing intercepted messages is often key to understanding the application's attack surface in detail.
  • Modifying request parameters often allows you to quickly identify common security vulnerabilities.

Intercepted requests and responses are displayed in an HTTP message editor, which contains numerous features designed to help you quickly analyze and manipulate the messages.

By default, Burp Proxy intercepts only request messages, and does not intercept requests for URLs with common file extensions that are often not directly interesting when testing (images, CSS, and static JavaScript). You can change this default behavior in the interception options. For example, you can configure Burp to only intercept in-scope requests containing parameters, or to intercept all responses containing HTML.

You may often want to turn off Burp's interception altogether, so that all HTTP messages are automatically forwarded without requiring user intervention. You can do this using the master interception toggle in the Intercept tab.

Using the Proxy history

Burp maintains a full history of all requests and responses that have passed through the Proxy. This enables you to review the browser-server conversation to understand how the application functions, or carry out key testing tasks. Sometimes you may want to completely disable interception in the Intercept tab, and freely browse a part of the application's functionality, before carefully reviewing the resulting requests and responses in the Proxy history.

Burp provides the following functions to help you analyze the Proxy history:

The history table can be sorted by clicking on any column header (clicking a header cycles through ascending sort, descending sort, and unsorted). This lets you quickly group similar items and identify any anomalous items.

You can use the display filter to hide items with various characteristics.

You can annotate items with highlights and comments, to describe their purpose or identify interesting items to come back to later.

Matic

You can open additional views of the history using the context menu, to apply different filters or help test access controls.

Burp Proxy testing workflow

A key part of Burp's user-driven workflow is the ability to send interesting items between Burp tools to carry out different tasks. You can do this using the context menus that you can access by right-clicking in various locations throughout Burp.

How To Disable Login Requests On Mac For Scoped Bookmark Agents

For example, having observed an interesting request in the proxy, you might want to quickly perform a vulnerability scan of just that request, using Burp Scanner.

You could send the request to Repeater to manually modify the request and reissue it over and over.

You could send the request to Intruder to perform various types of automated customized attacks.

You could send the request to Sequencer to analyze the quality of randomness in a token returned in the response.

You can perform all these actions and various others from the context menus that appear in both the Intercept tab and the Proxy history.

Key configuration options for Burp Proxy

For more specialized testing tasks, or when working with unusual applications, you may need to modify some of Burp Proxy's numerous options:

You might need to modify the Proxy listener, to bind to different interfaces, redirect requests to different hosts, handle server TLS certificates differently, or support invisible proxying for non-proxy-aware clients.

You can configure the Proxy to automatically modify HTTP responses in various systematic ways; for example, to unhide hidden form fields, remove JavaScript form validation, etc.

You can configure match / replace rules to automatically change the content of requests and responses.